What is help () in Python?

The help () function is a built-in function in Python that displays the documentation for a given object , such as a function, module, or class . If you call help () with no arguments, it will print a list of all the available modules, classes, and functions.

You can also use help () to get more information about a specific object, such as a function. To do this, simply pass the name of the object as an argument to help (). For example, to get more information about the print () function, you would call help (print).

The help () function is a great way to get started with learning about the Python API. It can also be used as a reference when you forget how a certain object works.

How can help () be used in Python programs?

The help () function can be used to display information about a module, class, function, or keyword in Python. When called without any arguments, help () will print a list of all available modules, classes, functions, and keywords. If called with a string containing the name of a module, class, function, or keyword, help () will print information about that item.

What are some benefits of using help () in Python?

There are many benefits of using help () in Python. It can help you to find information on modules, functions, and keywords, and it can also help you to understand what they do. Additionally, help () can be used to obtain information on the syntax of various Python constructs.

How can help () make Python programming easier?

Python’s help () function is a quick way to get information about a Python object. Simply pass in the name of the object, and help () will return a help page. This can be useful for exploring new modules, or getting a quick overview of an object’s methods and attributes.

For example, say you want to know more about the str type. You can use help () to get a help page for str:

>>> help(str)
Help on class str in module builtins:

class str(object)
| str(object=”) -> str
| str(bytes_or_buffer[, encoding[, errors]]) -> str
|
| Create a new string object from the given object. If encoding or
| errors is specified, then the object must expose a data buffer
| that will be decoded using the given encoding and error handler.
| Otherwise, returns the result of object.__str__() (if defined)
| or repr(object).
| encoding defaults to sys.getdefaultencoding().
| errors defaults to ‘strict’.
|
| Methods defined here:
|
| __add__(self, value, /)
| Return self+value.
|
| __contains__(self, key, /)
| Return key in self.
|
| __eq__(self, value, /)
| Return self==value.
|
| __format__(self, format_spec, /)
| Return a formatted version of the string as described by format_spec.
|
| __ge__(self, value, /)
| Return self>=value.
|
| __getattribute__(self, name, /)
| Return getattr(self, name).
|
| __getitem__(self, key, /)
| Return self[key].
|
| __getnewargs__(…)
|
| __gt__(self, value, /)
| Return self>value.
|
| __hash__(self, /)
| Return hash(self).
|
| __iter__(self, /)
| Implement iter(self).
|
| __le__(self, value, /)
| Return self<=value. | | __len__(self, /) | Return len(self). | | __lt__(self, value, /) | Return self str
|
| Return a capitalized version of S, i.e. make the first character
| have upper case and the rest lower case.
|
| casefold(…)
| S.casefold() -> str
|
| Return a version of S suitable for caseless comparisons.
|
| center(…)
| S.center(width[, fillchar]) -> str
|
| Return S centered in a string of length width. Padding is
| done using the specified fill character (default is a space)
|
| count(…)
| S.count(sub[, start[, end]]) -> int
|
| Return the number of non-overlapping occurrences of substring sub in
| string S[start:end]. Optional arguments start and end are
| interpreted as in slice notation.
|
| encode(…)
| S.encode(encoding=’utf-8′, errors=’strict’) -> bytes
|
| Encode S using the codec registered for encoding. Default encoding
| is ‘utf-8’. errors may be given to set a different error
| handling scheme. Default is ‘strict’ meaning that encoding errors raise
| a UnicodeEncodeError. Other possible values are ‘ignore’, ‘replace’ and
| ‘xmlcharrefreplace’ as well as any other name registered with
| codecs.register_error that can handle UnicodeEncodeErrors.
|
| endswith(…)
| S.endswith(suffix[, start[, end]]) -> bool
|
| Return True if S ends with the specified suffix, False otherwise.
| With optional start, test S beginning at that position.
| With optional end, stop comparing S at that position.
| suffix can also be a tuple of strings to try.
|
| expandtabs(…)
| S.expandtabs(tabsize=8) -> str
|
| Return a copy of S where all tab characters are expanded using spaces.
| If tabsize is not given, a tab size of 8 characters is assumed.
|
| find(…)
| S.find(sub[, start[, end]]) -> int
|
| Return the lowest index in S where substring sub is found,
| such that sub is contained within S[start:end]. Optionally
| start and end can be specified to find sub within S.
| Return -1 on failure.
|
| format(…)
| S.format(*args, **kwargs) -> str
|
| Return a formatted version of S, using substitutions from args and kwargs.
| The substitutions are identified by braces (‘{‘ and ‘}’).
|
| format_map(…)
| S.format_map(mapping) -> str
|
| Return a formatted version of S, using substitutions from mapping.
| The substitutions are identified by braces (‘{‘ and ‘}’).
|
| index(…)
| S.index(sub[, start[, end]]) -> int
|
| Like S.find() but raise ValueError when the substring is not found.
|
| isalnum(…)
| S.isalnum() -> bool
|
| Return True if all characters in S are alphanumeric
| and there is at least one character in S, False otherwise.
|
| isalpha(…)
| S.isalpha() -> bool
|
| Return True if all characters in S are alphabetic
| and there is at least one character in S, False otherwise.
|
| isdecimal(…)
| S.isdecimal() -> bool
|
| Return True if there are only decimal characters in S,
| False otherwise.
|
| isdigit(…)
| S.isdigit() -> bool
|
| Return True if all characters in S are digits
| and there is at least one character in S, False otherwise.
|
| isidentifier(…)
| S.isidentifier() -> bool
|
| Return True if S is a valid identifier according to the language
| definition, False otherwise.
|
| islower(…)
| S.islower() -> bool
|
| Return True if all cased characters in S are lowercase and there is
| at least one cased character in S, False otherwise.
|
| isnumeric(…)
| S.isnumeric() -> bool
|
| Return True if there are only numeric characters in S,
| False otherwise.
|
| isprintable(…)
| S.isprintable() -> bool
|
| Return True if all characters in S are considered
| printable in repr() or S is empty, False otherwise.
|
| isspace(…)
| S.isspace() -> bool
|
| Return True if all characters in S are whitespace
| and there is at least one character in S, False otherwise.
|
| istitle(…)
| S.istitle() -> bool
|
| Return True if S is a titlecased string and there is at least one
| character in S, i.e. upper- and titlecase characters may only
| follow uncased characters and lowercase characters only cased ones.
| Return False otherwise.
|
| isupper(…)
| S.isupper() -> bool
|
| Return True if all cased characters in S are uppercase and there is
| at least one cased character in S, False otherwise.
|
| join(…)
| S.join(iterable) -> str
|
| Return a string which is the concatenation of the strings in the
| iterable. The separator between elements is S.
|
| ljust(…)
| S.ljust(width[, fillchar]) -> str
|
| Return S left-justified in a Unicode string of length width. Padding is
| done using the specified fill character (default is a space).
|
| lower(…)
| S.lower() -> str
|
| Return a copy of the string S converted to lowercase.
|
| lstrip(…)
| S.lstrip([chars]) -> str
|
| Return a copy of the string S with leading whitespace removed.
| If chars is given and not None, remove characters in chars instead.
|
| maketrans(…)
| S.maketrans(x[, y[, z]]) -> dict
|
| Return a translation table usable for str.translate().
| If there is only one argument, it must be a dictionary mapping Unicode
| ordinals (integers) or characters to Unicode ordinals, strings or None.
| If there are two arguments, they must be strings of equal length, and
| in the resulting dictionary, each character in x will be mapped to the
| character at the same position in y. If there is a third argument, it
| must be a string, whose characters will be mapped to None in the result.
|
| partition(…)
| S.partition(sep) -> (head, sep, tail)
|
| Search for the separator sep in S, and return the part before it,
| the separator itself, and the part after it. If the separator is not
| found, return S and two empty strings.
|
| replace(…)
| S.replace(old, new[, count]) -> str
|
| Return a copy of S with all occurrences of substring
| old replaced by new. If the optional argument count is
| given, only the first count occurrences are replaced.
|
| rfind(…)
| S.rfind(sub[, start[, end]]) -> int
|
| Return the highest index in S where substring sub is found,
| such that sub is contained within S[start:end]. Optional
| arguments start and end are interpreted as in slice notation.
|
| rindex(…)
| S.rindex(sub[, start[, end]]) -> int
|
| Like S.rfind() but raise ValueError when the substring is not found.
|
| rjust(…)
| S.rjust(width[, fillchar]) -> str
|
| Return S right-justified in a string of length width. Padding is
| done using the specified fill character (default is a space).
|
| rpartition(…)
| S.rpartition(sep) -> (head, sep, tail)
|
| Search for the separator sep in S, starting at the end of S, and return
| the part before it, the separator itself, and the part after it. If
| the separator is not found, return two empty strings and S.
|
| rsplit(…)
| S.rsplit(sep=None, maxsplit=-1) -> list of strings
|
| Return a list of the words in S, using sep as the
| delimiter string, starting at the end of the string and
| working to the front. If maxsplit is given, at most maxsplit
| splits are done. If sep is not specified or is None, any
| whitespace string is a separator.
|
| rstrip(…)
| S.rstrip([chars]) -> str
|
| Return a copy of the string S with trailing whitespace removed.
| If chars is given and not None, remove characters in chars instead.
|
| split(…)
| S.split(sep=None, maxsplit=-1) -> list of strings
|
| Return a list of the words in S, using sep as the
| delimiter string. If maxsplit is given, at most maxsplit
| splits are done. If sep is not specified or is None, any
| whitespace string is a separator.
|
| splitlines(…)
| S.splitlines([keepends]) -> list of strings
|
| Return a list of the lines in S, breaking at line boundaries.
| Line breaks are not included in the resulting list unless keepends
| is given and true.
|
| startswith(…)
| S.startswith(prefix[, start[, end]]) -> bool
|
| Return True if S starts with the specified prefix, False otherwise.
| With optional start, test S beginning at that position.
| With optional end, stop comparing S at that position.
|

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What are some other things that help () can be used for in Python?

The help () function can be used for a lot of different things in Python. For instance, it can be used to get information about a module or a function. It can also be used to get help from the interactive Python interpreter.

In addition, the help () function can be used to find out about the internals of Python objects. For example, if you have a list object, you can use the help () function to find out about the methods that are available for that object.

Frequently Asked Questions – What is help () in Python?

How do you write a help function in Python? :

You have to use Ctrl + I in front of an object’s name to show their help in our Help pane.

What is Help function? :

The Python help function is used to display the documentation of modules, functions, classes, keywords, etc.

How do I find help in Python? :

Try help() or dir() . AFAIR there’s no builtin support for pdf-related tasks in plain Python installation. Another way to find help for Python modules is to google 😉 You have to have main python dir in your path.

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